L Visas

L visas – Quite often, a well-established foreign company wants to grow their operations internationally. If that company plans to expand their international business into the United States, they may be interested in the L Visa. L Visas allow an employer to petition for a foreign employee to work in their newly established U.S. branches. Depending on the skillset of the foreign employee, the employer may need to choose between applying for an L-1A visa or an L-1B visa.

Difference between L-1A and L-1B Visas

An L-1A visa allows a company to petition for a foreign employee on the basis that the employee is a manager or executive and is best suited to continue the company’s operations in the United States. The L-1A visa applicant needs to have worked abroad for the company for at least one continuous year within the three years prior to their being admitted into the United States. No labor certification is required for L-1A visa applicants.

The L-1B visa is reserved for employees who have specialized knowledge of the company’s operations. The applicant must have worked abroad for the company for at least one continuous year within the three years prior to their being admitted into the United States. A labor certification is required for L-1B visas.

How to Start the Process?

The L-1 visa applications is initiated by having the employer petition their employee for the visa. Form I-129, Petition for a Nonimmigrant Workermust be filled out and submitted to the USCIS, along with any applicable filing fees and supporting documentation. It may be wise to consider utilizing the assistance of an immigration attorney before submitting this application to the government.

Consider setting up a consultation with an immigration lawyer at Gilles Law, PLLC. You can reach us at 980-272-8438 at our office in Uptown Charlotte. We are here to assist with your inquiries.

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